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Churchill, Winston (1874 – 1965)

‘White men are worth just as much study as black: and you will do twice as much with their aid as against their opposition’

A fine three-page autograph letter signed by Churchill whilst on tour in British East Africa, ‘Winston S. Churchill’, 13th November 1907, on East Africa Protectorate headed paper and marked ‘strictly private’.

Churchill writes to Dundas [Kenneth Robert Dundas, District Commissioner of the East African Protectorate; 1882 – 1915], informing him, ‘It has been arranged according to our conversation. They will tell you officially in regular course. You will have to inform the local District Officer, but you will serve the Provincial Consul alone, and through him you may correspond with Hollis.’ [Alfred Claud Hollis, 1874 – 1961]

Churchill goes on, ‘I have had a lot of trouble to get this thing settled and have impressed my view upon others; and I do hope you will prove me right by making a great success of it in the only possible way – viz. by securing the friendly cooperation of the District Officer with whom you will come in contact on equal terms, in safeguarding native interests. White men are worth just as much study as black: and you will do twice as much with their aid as against their opposition. I am sure your personal qualities will be equal to the task.’ Churchill closes, ‘I am very glad indeed we met and made friends. Mind you write to me and tell me how the world wags. Yours sincerely, Winston S. Churchill’.

Letter folds and slight foxing, otherwise in fine condition.

An intriguing letter, written during Churchill’s tour of Africa (later written up in My African Journey) that hints at a colonial, hierarchical view on race. At the time of this letter, the native population of the East Africa Protectorate (effectively modern-day Kenya) was approximately four millions, whereas the white population numbered 1,813, including 264 Government officials.